We Moved! WE MOVED

Shoutweb Fan Q&A

Friday, February 11, 2005

Shoutweb Fan Q&A

Katie Lewis of Ft. Lauderdale, FL asks: What is the one thing you wish didn't change with your newfound fame and popularity? (e.g. the way you're treated, being away from home all the time, etc.)

Mike: We're not at the point where we can't walk outside, but I definitely appreciate my time at home alone with family and loved ones.

Jack Fonderwhite of Santa Cruz, USA asks: On the cover of "Hybrid Theory" and on many other Linkin Park items a soldier hoisting a flag is pictured. I always think of Linkin Park when I see similar images, making me realize what an interesting choice for a symbol this was. What prompted the band's use of the soldier hoisting the flag as its icon?

Mike: The soldier isn't the whole image, the dragonfly wings are just as important. Together, they symbolize the way we made this album, by mixing aggressive elements and softer, introverted elements.

Malu Faccio of Eagle Pass, TX asks: What was it that triggered/inspired you to write the lyrics, "I tried so hard, and got so far, but in the end, it doesn't even matter.." for the song "In The End"? What was the experience that made you write them?

Mike: Those just popped out. I think I was reacting to the things we as a band had gone through in the beginning. The song almost doesn't know if it wants to be optimistic or pessimistic - the beginning is a little dark, but you can't tell (lyrically) if it resolves or not. That's what I like about it.

Barry Porch of Salem, NJ asks: What made you go out and do it? I mean a lot of people want to be in a band and want to get their music heard. But what made you go out and say, "We can do this." Did you even think you would become a big name?

Mike: We have worked really hard on our songwriting since day one. That has always been the foundation: a drive to make something we can be proud of, not a drive to be big popular rock stars.

Naomi Haworth of Toronoto, Canada asks: The first time I heard "By Myself" I automatically cried, but fell in love... and I've listened to that song so many times it hurts too much to count. Which one of your songs was able to trigger the same kind of emotions, and if your songs weren't able to do that which song that you've ever heard was able to hit you the same way?

Mike: There's a song by Onelinedrawing that I found on the Internet that I love in that way. It's called "Pollyanna".

Nate Hicks of Chesapeake Bay, VA asks: I was just wondering how you guys found that right musical chemistry and harmony that is so hard to find today. I've been in a band for about two years and I've been experimenting with a sound similar to your guys band, and no matter how many people we try with, I can never seem to harmonize with our other lyricist, we either just can't blend the parts or come up with those little sweet phrases you guys add to songs like in "Papercut" where in the background you just repeat "The sun goes down, I feel the light betrayed me", that's just beautiful, I'm just wondering if you can tell me when you find that chemistry.

Mike: Chester and I started writing our best stuff when we talked about the parts and their meanings without defensiveness or pride. The importance is placed on the best part, not who is writing it.

Joe DePrince of Collingdale, PA asks: Can you describe the feeling you got when you first saw your video for "One Step Closer" on TV and heard your songs on the radio?

Mike: It's eerie; it felt natural even though we knew it wasn't. Like an overwhelming of deja vu. After that, I remember feeling really grateful to our fans. I still am... in fact sometimes I go to linkinpark.com's message board just to give my thanks however I can.

Ross Smith of New York, NY asks: I have listened to "Esaul" which seems pretty much like an unfinished version of "A Place For My Head". Just wondering if you guys did a lot re-writes before going into the studio to get your songs to be "perfect", because you essentially created one of the tightest albums I have ever heard. The song structure is, well, perfect.

Mike: We have been re-writing the older songs, like that one, for a few years before we even got signed. And some of the songs, like "Papercut", just came together relatively quickly.

Jessica Ortiz of Coral Springs, FL asks: Do you believe touring with Ozzfest will change the way your career is going up to this point? Follow up question: Do you feel that it will expand your fan base? Do you think that the hardcore kids that go to Ozzfest will like your band? How do you feel about playing with the other artists on Ozzfest?

Mike: We are proud to be playing on Ozzfest, and hope that the people attending enjoy our set. Our favorite types of music include hip-hop, electronic, alternative and hardcore. I know some of our fans are also fans of some heavy shit. Those fans are the ones probably most likely to come to Ozzfest - hopefully we can introduce our other influences to some of the hardcore kids who are less familiar with them.

Daniel Stridsberg of Täby, Sweden asks: In your video for "One Step Closer", there are these flying guys in red coats with face paintings and stuff. I have always wondered what they are supposed to symbolize or what they are suppose to be. Are they something you just figured out yourself or is it something else?

Mike: "One Step Closer" was just for fun. It was an escapist action movie video. Our next one though (for "Crawling") is going to be a story - not one that follows the song's story, but a story about the way a song can help you get through problems.

Jesse Williamson of Chicago, IL asks: Who have been your favorite bands to tour with?

Mike: We had a great time with (hed)pe, P.O.D., Papa Roach, Taproot, Styles Of Beyond and Deftones. In fact, all of our tours have been really positive. And we're excited to see who we can tour with in the future. Nine Inch Nails? Tool? Depeche Mode? Jurassic 5? Prodigy? Who knows. Regardless, we'll be there for our fans and playing our hardest for them.